Super Mouse

Publisher: Pines
Publication Dates: December 1948 – September 1955
Number of Issues Published: 34 (#1 – #34)
Color: Color
Dimensions: Standard Golden Age U.S.; Standard Silver Age U.S.
Paper Stock: Glossy Cover; Newsprint Interior
Binding: Saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: Was Ongoing Series
Publication Type: magazine

Numbering continues with Supermouse, the Big Cheese (Pines, 1956 series) #35

The Big Cheese

Publisher: Pines
Publication Dates: April 1956 – Fall 1958
Number of Issues Published: 11 (#35 – #45)
Color: color
Dimensions: standard Silver Age US
Paper Stock: glossy cover; newsprint interior
Binding: saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: was ongoing series
Publication Type: magazine

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

During the early 1940s, comic book racks were rife with superheroes. But only a few stalwarts managed to survive beyond 1950. These included the biggest names — names such as Plastic Man … Captain Marvel … The Justice Society of America … Supermouse
(aka “The Big Cheese”) … who may have been a mere funny animal, but he was the longest-running comic book star the publishing empire of Ned Pines ever had. ‘

October, 1942 was also the month Terrytoons introduced an animated character named Super Mouse. Terrytoons mogul Paul Terry retroactively changed the name of his to Mighty Mouse, to avoid publicizing someone else’s character. Between them, these mice were the first two ongoing funny animal superheroes (tho Bugs Bunny had previously been “Super-Duper Rabbit” in a oneshot story in the Looney Tunes comic book). Since normal publishing lead times caused comic books to appear on the stands a couple of months before their cover dates, the edge goes to this one as the very first to appear before the public — the precursor to DC’s Terrific Whatzit, Marvel’s Super Rabbit, Fox’s Cosmo Cat, and all the rest.

Supermouse went on to become either the most successful funny animal superhero ever to come out of comic books or the second-most, depending on whether or not Super Goof’s secret identity as Disney’s Goofy disqualifies him as a native-born comic book character. Tho the Coo Coo title fell by the wayside in 1952, he’d gotten his own comic in ’48, and kept it until Fall, 1958. It ended only when the publishing company itself (which had gone by the names Standard, Better, Nedor and several others over the years) folded. Among the writers and artists to work on the character were Dan Gordon (creator of The Flintstones), Richard Hughes (creator of Herbie) and Gene Fawcette (who had credits at Quality Comics, Dell and many other publishers).

==================================================

UPDATE 14-02-2020

Supermouse 010

Download

==================================================

==================================================

UPDATE 18-11-2019

8

Download

==================================================

1-7,9,11,12

Download

13-18

Download

19-25

Download

26-30,32

Download

33-38

Download

39,41-45

Download

Giant Summer Issue 1958 Summer Holiday 1957

Download

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s